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Young Master Club celebrates 16 years with Taekwondo demonstration

The Young Master Club is open to people of all abilities, with programming for the whole family. (Galan McDougall/CTV News Edmonton) The Young Master Club is open to people of all abilities, with programming for the whole family. (Galan McDougall/CTV News Edmonton)

Edmonton families showcased their martial art skills on Saturday.

The Young Master Club celebrated its 16th anniversary with a Taekwondo festival at the Alberta Avenue Community League, where students of all ages and abilities showcased their technique.

"It's a culmination of 16 years of hard work, working with children, families and schools of all abilities using the powerful artform of Taekwondo, where we learn courtesy, integrity, perseverance, self-control and indomitable spirit," said JonJon Rivero, master instructor and occupational therapist.

The club is an occupational therapy-inspired program teaching families life skills through adapted fitness activities, including martial arts and yoga. It's part of the Qi Adventure Club, which offers inclusive programming in Edmonton.

Rivero said – despite the name - the Young Master Club isn't just for kids. He said the whole family can benefit from learning to work together and express their emotions through movement.

"It actually calms our brain, our fight, flight or fright," he added. "And it also helps us also feel more confident and gain self-esteem.

"We get to learn about ourselves and the talents and the skills that we have through martial arts."  

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