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Edmontonians join in international Write for Rights campaign

Edmontonians gathered Sunday to participate in Amnesty International's Write for Rights Day. (Brandon Lynch/CTV News Edmonton) Edmontonians gathered Sunday to participate in Amnesty International's Write for Rights Day. (Brandon Lynch/CTV News Edmonton)
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Edmontonians gathered at the John Humphrey Centre for Peace and Human Rights Sunday in recognition of Human Rights Day.

Dec. 10 marked 75 years since the United Nations adopted its Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The declaration outlines a set of fundamental human rights to be universally protected.  

To celebrate the anniversary, Amnesty Edmonton invited people to spend the day writing letters, signing petitions and sharing messages of solidarity on social media in support of people whose rights are at risk.

The group said the event encourages people to explore different avenues of protest.

Amnesty International's Write for Rights campaign was focused on ten people and communities, including the Wet'suwet'en First Nation in British Columbia. 

Many writers also chose to use their voice to amplify calls for a ceasefire in Gaza.

"It feels like the stakes are much higher this year," said Kim Thorsen from Amnesty Edmonton. "With over 16,000 people dead in Gaza already and 8,000 of those children, we can't miss the opportunity to try to shed light on that and bring attention to that fact."

According to the Health Ministry in Hamas-Controlled Gaza, more than 17,700 Palestinians have been killed, with two-thirds of them women and children. 

Amnesty International said the event has show positive results in past years. The organization was aiming to break last year's record of 2.7 million letters written around the world.

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