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UCP constituency youth event sparks controversy online over age range

A screenshot of a now-deleted social media post from and RCMP officer, calling out a UCP constituency dance for 14 to 25 year olds. (Source: X) A screenshot of a now-deleted social media post from and RCMP officer, calling out a UCP constituency dance for 14 to 25 year olds. (Source: X)
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A youth dance being hosted by the United Conservative Party Lacombe-Ponoka UCP Constituency Association is seeing online backlash over the age range of invitees. 

While it was presented on Facebook as a "youth spring dance and social," the event is open to ages 14 to 25.

The constituency association's original Facebook post received dozens of negative reactions, but comments were not public.

Many reposting the event on Facebook expressed concerns over the age range, while some others defended the event as a party event for younger members.

RCMP Sgt. Kerry Shima with the Internet Child Exploitation Unit, reposted the event on X on his personal account Saturday night saying 25-year-olds are "not youths."

"Who planned this wanting to see 14 year old and 25 year olds dancing together?" Shima asked in the post.

"The ICE Unit is overworked with cases & the last thing my teams need is a sanctioned dance encouraging adults to cavort with teens," the post continued.

Shima's repost of the event received more than 300,000 views before it was deleted Sunday. 

The Alberta NDP have the New Democratic Youth of Alberta for members aged 14 to 30, and the Alberta Green Party have the Young Greens Council for members aged 12 to 29.

The UCP does not have a youth wing.

CTV News Edmonton reached out to the UCP Lacombe-Ponoka constituency association for comment but has not yet received a response. 

 

  

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