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Edmonton-based Titilope Sonuga chosen as poet laureate

Titilope Sonuga, a poet, playwright and performer, will become Edmonton’s ninth poet laureate. Titilope Sonuga, a poet, playwright and performer, will become Edmonton’s ninth poet laureate.
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Titilope Sonuga, a poet, playwright and performer, will become Edmonton’s ninth poet laureate.

Sonuga has served on various artistic and community boards in Edmonton and is the founder of Breath in Poetry Collective. She is also the author of three collections of poetry: “Down to Earth” (2011), “Abscess” (2014) and “This Is How We Disappear” (2019).

She has scripted global advertising campaigns for organizations such as The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Google, Intel Corporation, WHO, White Ribbon Alliance and The MacArthur Foundation, according to a release.

Having travelled extensively, the poet has facilitated adult and youth workshops across the world.

“Since 2005 the City of Edmonton has been entrusting artists to observe and reflect our lives, our city, and our people through poetry,” said Mayor Don Iveson. “I am delighted to welcome powerhouse local poet and community builder Titilope Sonuga to the role of Edmonton’s Poet Laureate and see how she transforms the role, and our city through her passion and stunning prose.”

Starting July 1, Sonuga will serve as Edmonton’s poet laureate for two years. Acting as an ambassador, the role of the poet is to reflect the city of Edmonton through readings and poetry – including official and informal events.

“Titilope Sonuga will also bring a welcoming and inclusive spirit to the role. Her focus on healing and hope makes space for all Edmontonians to come together through poetry and is exactly what the City needs in this moment,” said Edmonton Arts Council Director, Sanjay Shahani.

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